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View Poll Results: Do you use a Surge Protector for your PC?
Yes 23 71.88%
No 5 15.63%
What the heck is a Surge Protector? 4 12.50%
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 10:24 AM   #1
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Default Do you use a Surge Protector for your PC?

(surge protector/suppressor)

I was doing a lot of reasearch on the net to learn more about the technical aspects of these devices recently. On my one PC i've always had one. just bought it because i knew it was good to have it. Now i have a much better understanding of the whole thing. I need to get one for my other PC which has nothing right now. worries me everytime i turn on the A/C. I was curious what the situation would be with you fine folks. Maybe any suggestions on models? First time doing a poll, seems like a good enough topic to me
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 10:35 AM   #2
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I plug everything in to a surge protector power bar but I honestly have never heard of a surge suppressor. BTW it is a good one not a cheapy.

surge suppressor

See also uninterruptible power supply.

A surge suppressor (sometimes optimistically called a "surge protector") is a device inserted in the alternating current (AC) utility line and/or telephone line to prevent damage to electronic equipment from voltage "spikes" called transients. A more accurate term for this type of device is "transient suppressor." A typical surge suppressor is a small box with several utility outlets, a power switch, and a 3-wire cord for plugging into a wall outlet.

In most countries where electronic equipment is used, the effective AC utility voltage is 110 to 120 volts; the peak voltage is on the order of plus-or-minus 160 to 170 volts at a frequency of 60 hertz. But transients, which arise from various causes, commonly reach peak levels of several hundred volts. These pulses are of short duration, measured in microseconds (units of 10-6 second), but in that time, they can cause hardware to malfunction. The worst type of transient occurs when lightning strikes in the vicinity (it is not necessary for a power line to be directly hit). Such a "spike" can peak at thousands of volts and cause permanent damage to equipment.

A surge suppressor prevents the peak AC voltage from going above a certain threshold such as plus-or-minus 200 volts. semiconductor devices are used for this purpose. The power line is effectively short-circuited to electrical ground for transient pulses exceeding the threshold, while the flow of normal 60-Hz current is unaffected. For the suppressor to work, a 3-wire AC power connection must be used. "Cheater" adapters, which allow 3-wire appliances to be used with 2-wire outlets or extension cords, defeat the electrical ground connection and render most surge suppressors ineffective.

Surge suppressors should be used as a matter of habit with all semiconductor-based electronic and computer hardware, including peripherals such as printers, monitors, external disk drives, and modems. But the suppressor should not be relied upon to provide protection against lightning-induced transients. The safest procedure, inconvenient though it be, is to ensure that all susceptible hardware is plugged into the suppressor box, and to unplug the suppressor's main power cord when the equipment is not in use if you live in a thunderstorm-prone area.
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 10:51 AM   #3
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Thumbs up Hey LT.

The first surge protector I bought 4 my pc cost me $55 and the only exceptional thing about it compared 2 a regular pc protector was the fact it gave me 5 xtra minutes 2 shut everything down. Trust me wont due that again. Plus the battery 4 the $55 one cost almost as much as the surge protector itself. inexperience what a teacher. lol
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 10:51 AM   #4
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I have always used a surge protector of some sort, but when I moved into the apartment I have now I quickly learned how unstable the electricity was. I then started using a UPS from APC. Between the 5 second power interuptions, and the "electrical noise" (APC's term) I am very happy to have one.

The time I was most glad to have it was the morning after work when I went to boot up and just about half way in to the boot BAM, the power goes out. Because of the battery the system instantly switched and I was able to shutdown with out incident. I shudder to think what could have happened with such a sudden interuption in power during booting.
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 10:55 AM   #5
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A surge protector and a UPS. Watch when buying surge protectors some cheapo's only have 1 varistor in them. A good one will have 3.
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 11:17 AM   #6
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I always have used a surge protector/suppressor and battery backup combination. Has absolutely saved me from probable dire trouble more than a few times. Why would you spend the money for a computer system and NOT try to protect it? Firm believer.
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 11:22 AM   #7
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sorry fellas, i screwed up with the title. there are many names for these blasted things. i saw surge bar, surge board, surge suppressor, transient bar etc. you know what it's all about though.
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 11:28 AM   #8
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LT.
You forgot, you know that long plugy thingy.
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 11:31 AM   #9
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They are worth every penny. The one I have will also suppress the cable line, telephone line, and and has room for 3 transformers outlets. I also have a power bar plugged into it because of all the other stuff that is running near my desk.

A friends camp (cottage) was hit by lightning. Every thing that had electronics was fried except his computer! His alarm clock, microwave, stove, TV, DVDplayers, VCR etc. were kaput! Boy was he glad to have insurance! This is when he found out that you can actually put a surge suppressor in the fuse box and protect everything except a direct strike to the house. The insurance company demanded it so he could keep his insurance!
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 11:36 AM   #10
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lol coda.

well everywhere i read these things don't protect against lightning. makes sense though. how could it suppress 50 bazillion volts? some of my associates actualy shut off an unplug their pc's during a thunderstorm.
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 11:38 AM   #11
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I do!
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 11:41 AM   #12
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I plug every thing in to a surge protector, all high end stuff I use GOOD ones!

There was one time I didnt have something pluged into one. I had just movied and pluged a tv into the wall with out one. That night there was a storm, lightning struck! Flames shot out of the outlet in the wall... the power cord was melted to the socket in the wall and the TV was DEAD! 100% !


Never again! LOL

This is similar to the one I use:

http://brandnamez.com/merchant.ihtml...AffNo=44658133

And this one for my computers:
http://www.dealtime.co.uk/xPF-Belkin...rity_II_F5C140
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 11:47 AM   #13
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scary stuff. i understand the power supply has some sort of residual suppressor of it's own. running everest on this thing might be a good idea. i hope it's enough for the next day or 2.
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 11:47 AM   #14
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I use a suppressor and also have a protector mounted on my fuse panel in the basement that shunts the whole thing to ground in the even of a lightning strike or spike. A surge supressor cannot block a lightning strike but can divert it to ground before it reaches your equipment. The key word is clamping voltage, the good ones clamp (that is to say "shut down") at 300 Volts but no more, most power supplies can handle a peak in that range. If you have a refrigerator or anything with a motor on the same circuit as your protector you will need a surge protector at the outlet of your computer as A/C can spike within a circuit. Not all spikes come from outside the home.
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Old 3 Jun 2006, 11:52 AM   #15
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the electrical system here needs improving. in the bloody kitchen if i have the toaster, coffee maker and switch the tv on, the bloody breaker goes. got to have a system. the more you people post here the more worried i am getting.
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